PSYCHOSIS: A Story About A Man Who Defies Society

singles 49I stumbled on this piece penned by Kingsley Okechukwu and originally published on kingkingsley.wordpress.com, and I felt compelled to share it here. The protagonist talked about in the story is the writer’s uncle, and the writer details how, for years, his uncle had defied the societal standard of marriage. I decided to share the story here, not because this uncle was portrayed as a gay man (he wasn’t) but because I wanted to let us know how powerful society can be when it strives to maintain its norms, and how any means is employable by it to ensure this.

Check on it below.

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Uncle Chukwuka is the most famous character in our entire family circle. His popularity is stretched by his refusal to adhere to the normal fabric of life, and coloured by some of the weirdest attitudes that have shocked, amused and infuriated his kinsfolk. I have been trying to write a story about Uncle Chukwuka for six years now. Each time I picked up my pen, the words came out in small, turgid mounds so that after few paragraphs, I would conclude that I have been writing nonsense, that these strange words weren’t describing my uncle; these words were in fact dishonouring him. Then I would tear off the paper from my workbook, squeeze it into a ball and hurl it out of the window. And forget about my uncle for a month. Continue reading

Questions Of The Heart

singles 34WRITER’S NOTE: This poem is dedicated to the moment I first ached to meet a hookup from Grindr, and to all those moments everyone reading this has desired that someone on the other side of the chatversation whom they’ve desired without meeting.

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Why do I think of you?

Why do I wonder what you are up to?

Why do I care what goes on with you

When you and I have never met

Is this love or lust

Or loneliness crying out for a companion Continue reading

KIZITO SPEAKS VI

Blog_Kizito SpeaksRead the prequel to this episode HERE

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I settled down and was taking in the details of the living room. I wasn’t very comfortable. Lamar’s friend – who he introduced as Joe – had welcomed me briefly and gone back in to finish a cigarette. Lamar went to get refreshment. He mixed Ogidiga with Hollandia Strawberry Yogurt and offered me a glass to sip. I declined, but he was persistent.

I thought to myself, does he want to drug me and then –

But he had mixed the drinks in my very before. Anyway, I took the glass and took a sip. Hmm. Bitter-sweet taste. I kinda liked it. He sat down across me and kept his stare fixated on my features. Me, I simply kept my own gaze on the mute TV and paid attention to the music coming from the stereo.

“I like your music…” I said. Continue reading

Anti-Gay Pastor’s Grindr Activity Is Exposed, Church Warns Congregants Not To Read Story

grindrRecently, the news was broken of a Reverend Matthew Makela, a pastor in Midland, Michigan with a track record of making damaging statements towards the gay and transgender communities, and how he cruises Grindr for sex with gay men (Read HERE). Following the exposé, the Reverend had had to step down from his position at St. John’s Lutheran Church.

On Tuesday, the Senior Pastor of St. John’s, Reverend Daniel Kempin, posted an open letter to congregants on the church’s website.

“It is my grief to inform you that Pastor Makela announced his resignation as a pastor of St. John’s through a letter that was read in worship on Sunday, May 17,” he begins. Continue reading

HIS KITO STORY (EDITION 16)

Young man with tear rolling down cheek, portrait, close-up

It was a boring afternoon at the office. With no other alternative to keep my mind busy, I logged onto 2go, an app I hadn’t used in ages. I wanted to see if I could reconnect with some old friends and perhaps make new friends. I logged in and found none of my friends online. I navigated to the gay room. I sifted through the various chats and profiles present in there, before happening on a dude named Richard. It wasn’t long before we started getting acquainted.

Richard was thirty-two, a cute bottom, a graduate of the University of Nigeria, Nsukka, and worked with a company in Asaba, where he also lived with his wife who was then pregnant – at least that’s what he told me. In the following weeks, we chatted and talked on the phone more and more, and I felt drawn to him. I began to fancy him a friend.

About a month after we met, he extended an invitation to me to visit him in Asaba. He sounded so genuine and was persuasive, but for one odd reason or the other, I kept postponing my trip to Asaba. A part of me wished he would grow weary of inviting me and perhaps withdraw or abandon his repeated invitations. Continue reading