LOVE AND SEX IN THE CITY (Episode 18)

Blog_Love And Sex In The City“Get out! Get out, get out!” I panted furiously, tapping Paschal’s thigh with my right hand in small, rapid movements.

“What?” he muttered uncomprehendingly.

“I said get out!” Irritation and pain sharpened my tone.

He stiffened and then began to pull back. There was no care to his withdrawal, and the removal of his penis pulled at my anal skin, unlocking pockets of pain that caused my sphincter muscles to clench and another choked scream to erupt from my mouth.

“Gently, please…gently…” My voice broke, and tears stung my eyes.

My distress must have finally communicated itself to him, because he began to gradually inch out of me. Even with his deliberate motions, I still felt pinpricks of pain shooting up my spine from the orifice. When he was finally out, I felt the slight rush of air inside the ass hole that came from such a release, but with the pulsation of my sphincter muscles, the draft stung.

“Oh no, Declan…” Paschal breathed out behind me.

What – what is it?” I asked, turning my head around as I spoke.

He was peeling back the condom from his cock, and I could see that the latex was stained red. The colour of what could only be my blood. A wave of nausea at the sight surged through me, and I moved my right hand to my derriere, wincing as I tentatively touched my fingers to my anus. It felt moist to the touch. The pain throbbed.

“You’re bleeding…” Paschal said. Continue reading

“I’d defend gay rights ‘to the death’.” – Benedict Cumberbatch

"The Imitation Game" Premiere - Arrivals - 2014 Toronto International Film FestivalBenedict Cumberbatch has said he would fight religious extremists to the death in defence of the right to express one’s sexuality.

Cumberbatch, who stars in The Imitation Game as Alan Turing, the brilliant Second World War code-breaker who was persecuted by the British authorities for being gay, lamented the horrors faced by gay people in many countries and fiercely declared his determination to stand with them in an interview with Out Magazine.

“People are being beheaded in countries right now because of their beliefs or sexual orientations,” he said. “It’s terrifying. It’s medieval — a beheading! I’d take up arms against someone who was telling me I had to believe in what they believed or they would kill me. I would fight them. I would fight them to the death. And, I believe, the older you get, you have to have an idea of what’s right or wrong. You can’t have unilateral tolerance. You have to have a point where you go, ‘Well, religious fundamentalism is wrong.’” Continue reading

That Piece About How To Be Queer In Your Church

gay-christian-500x380Written by Derrick Clifton, originally published in thoughtcatalog.com

It’s not easy being a religious queer person.

It’s even harder while part of a congregation that spews homophobia in pulpits and prevents LGBT people from attaining positions of leadership. Other churches go as far to deny sacraments like communion or other religious rites because of what they deem as “deviant” and “ungodly” lifestyles. And for those called to ministry, the roadblocks are plenty.

Though, in my own experience of reconciling my faith and sexuality, it took time for me to understand my own sense of spirituality. When I first came to terms with my identity as a gay man, there was hardly a night that I wasn’t anxious about how it may impact my faith beliefs and how I engaged church. So, in a quest to find answers, I rummaged dozens of websites and covertly found books in libraries to try and make sense of things.

Perhaps the most liberating aspect of that journey was that I found a new freedom — a freedom to explore my spirituality.

For the first time in my young life, I had to break free from being completely dependent on church sermons and ministers. And it wasn’t an easy process. In fact, it took years before I felt spiritually healthy and it’s still a work in progress. Continue reading

‘I Have A Male Soul.’ – says Singer Charice

Charice-PempengcoFormer Glee star and pop singer, Charice has revealed she’s slowly becoming a man – but she won’t be changing her body.

The Filipino star taped a new interview with Oprah Winfrey, who discovered the singer/actress almost a decade ago, and she told the TV titan she’s changing her look to embrace her “male soul”.

Charice, who announced she was gay last year (Jun13), insists she’ll never follow Cher’s son Chaz Bono, who underwent gender reassignment to become a man – but she wants to look like one. She explains, “I’m not exactly transitioning to a male, but basically my soul is, like, male. But I’m not going to go through that stage where I’m going to change everything – not change my body.

“I’ll cut my hair and wear boy clothes and everything, but that’s all.”

Charice also recalled the moment when she realised she was gay, adding, “‘I knew when I was five. I was in grade school and I saw this girl and I felt different. I didn’t know what it was but I just knew that time, like, it felt special. And when I was 10, I was like, ‘Oh, that’s it, I’m gay’. I found the word.”

The interview airs in America today (19Oct14).

LIVING WITH HATE

singles 25You can be the ripest, juiciest peach in the world, and there’s still going to be somebody who hates peaches. – Dita Von Teese

Mother Theresa (1910 – 1997) was a Catholic nun of Albanian origin, who lived in India for most of her life. She founded the missionaries of charity, a Roman Catholic religious organization which as at 2012 had become active in over 130 countries worldwide. She and her nuns dedicated their lives to caring for the sick and bringing comfort to the dying.  She was proclaimed a living saint not only by Catholics, but also by Protestants, Jews, Muslims, Hindus and Buddhists, and was popularly known by all as ‘the saint of the gutter.’ Mother Teresa was the recipient of numerous honours including the 1979 Nobel Peace Prize. In 2003, she was beatified as “Blessed Teresa of Calcutta”.

To me, if there was ever a ripe, juicy peach, a kind-hearted woman who lived a phenomenal life, devoted to the poor and downtrodden, to peace and the end of violence such as Mother Teresa was it. Continue reading