Mozambique decriminalises gay and lesbian relationships

lambda-website-imageMozambique has decriminalized homosexuality in its new penal code, making it one of a few African countries where same-sex relationships are legal.

The revised code drops a colonial-era clause outlawing “vices against nature”. There were no prosecutions under that clause but rights activists have said this change is a symbolic victory.

It comes as other African countries have moved to tighten anti-gay laws. In Nigeria, a law that came into force last year banned same-sex public displays of affection and introduced a possible 14-year prison sentence for gay sex. A study released on Tuesday found that 87% of Nigerians supported a ban on same-sex relations.

In Uganda, the government has pledged to introduce a new restrictive law after the last law which criminalized homosexuality was successfully challenged in the constitutional court. Continue reading

Ugandan Scientists Agree: Homosexuality Is Natural

PIC BY RACHEL ADAMS -  pictured: Gay Pride Uganda

A group of Ugandan scientists have endorsed a study showing being gay is natural.

The study, Diversity in Sexuality: Implications for Policy in Africa, was put together by the Academy of Science of South Africa, and endorsed by Ugandan National Academy of Sciences.

Uganda’s infamous anti-gay laws were justified with a study which Ugandan MPs claimed stated: “Homosexuality is not a disease but merely an abnormal behaviour which may be learned through experiences in life. In every society, there is a small number of people with homosexuality tendencies. Continue reading

A Look Inside The Homophobia Of Uganda

gallery-uganda3“Tell me something about Ugandan culture,” prompts Vice correspondent, Isobel Yeung, to a group of locals on a recent trip to investigate violence against gays in the country.

“The first thing we hate is homosexuality,” one man begins. “We hate that one completely. If we find a woman with a woman, we pull out one and we do it to her…We have sex with her…Serious rape.”

“So what would you do if you saw a gay man?” asks Yeung. Continue reading

Proposed law in Uganda could be used to shut down pro-gay charities

ug_1755091cA new law has been drafted in Uganda that could be used to ban all pro-gay charities and LGBT rights groups.

The country’s new Non-Governmental Organisations (NGO) bill would give the government the ability to approve, inspect, and dissolve all community groups and NGOs based on a number of criteria – as well as to impose harsh fines.

One clause would require charities to “not engage in any activity which is contrary to the dignity of the people of Uganda” – which proponents fear could be used to clamp down on gay rights groups.

It would also allow groups to be disbanded “where it is in the public interest to refuse to register the organisation, or for any other reason that the Board may deem relevant.” Continue reading

Activists For Gay Rights in Uganda Risk Lives To Publish LGBT Magazine

bombasticMost African countries are a testament of how much LGBT visibility is needed in them. And Uganda is one of them.

Now, despite risks to the livelihoods of publishers, interviewed subjects, experts, writers and more, the country is getting just what it needs in the form of a courageous gay magazine, Bombastic.

According to The Independent:

‘Campaigners in Kampala have launched Bombastic to “share the realities of being gay” in Uganda, where homosexuality activity is illegal, the mainstream media is openly hostile towards gay people and the government has repeatedly tried to introduce new laws to ban the “promotion of homosexuality.” Continue reading

Let’s Discuss…About Homosexuality Being African

Blog_Let's DiscussFrom Dakar to Guinea to Burkina Faso to Nigeria to Kenya and to Uganda, there is a wealth of evidence pointing to the existence of homosexuality in sub-Saharan Africa before so-called Western influence.

1. In traditional, monarchical Zande culture [Central Africa], homosexuality is indigenous. […] Indeed it is very sensible for a man to sleep with boys when women are not available or are taboo.

2. Among the Kaguru of Tanzania, some women practise lesbian activities during female initiation, women taking both the roles of men and of women in demonstrating sexual congress to initiates.

3. Among the Mossi in what is now Burkina Faso, soronés (pages), chosen from among the most beautiful boys aged seven to fifteen, were dressed and had the other attributes (including the role) of women in relation to chiefs.

4. [And] according to Eva Meyerowitz’s fieldwork in the Gold Coast (now Ghana) during the 1940s, “lesbian affairs were virtually universal among unmarried Akan women, sometimes continuing after marriage. Whenever possible, the women purchased extra- large beds to accommodate group sex sessions involving perhaps half-a-dozen women.

The above are just four examples excerpted from Stephen O. Murray’s discourse of the evidence of homosexuality among various cultures in sub-Saharan Africa. Download Free PDF here.

So… Continue reading

New Anti-Gay Legislation Drafted In Uganda

And it’s even more draconian than the Anti-Homosexuality Act, struck down earlier this year.

la-fg-wn-obama-antigay-law-uganda-20140216-002A committee, comprising leading members of Uganda’s ruling party, has prepared a new draft of legislation targeting LGBT people, according to Nicholas Opiyo, a human rights lawyer who obtained a leaked copy of the proposal.

The legislation will replace the Anti-Homosexuality Act, which was struck down on technical grounds in August following a global outcry.

Opiyo, who is one of the lawyers for the legal team that successfully challenged the Anti-Homosexuality Act, said his sources “in cabinet and on the committee [working on the bill] have confirmed that this is the real draft bill” and that it has been sent to the office of President Yoweri Museveni and newly named Prime Minister Ruhakana Rugunda.

The new bill, dated Oct. 29, is called the Prohibition of Promotion of Unnatural Sexual Practices Bill of 2014. Opiyo said, “It appears even worse, even more draconian than the law. It is intended to replace by going into much greater detail about what activities are criminalized.” Continue reading

Ugandan Men complain that Condoms are Too Small for Them

200274006-001Many Ugandan men have reportedly complained to the government that the condoms in Uganda are too small for them.

The condoms have been described as being “too short for their sexual organs,” Metro UK reports.

According to reports, the small size of the condoms often leads to increased pressure during sex, which tends to cause the condoms to  unexpectedly burst, thus providing inadequate protection against HIV.

About 80,000 people in Uganda die every year from HIV. Condoms are seen as an imperative means of battling the disease, and so the government is taking the complaints about the condoms very seriously, and is seeking a lasting solution to the issue.

Hmm… condoms too small for their dicks. These Ugandan men must be generously endowed. Which Kitodiariesian is moving to Uganda as we speak? 😀

Uganda holds its first gay pride following overturn of anti-gay law

imageUganda has hosted its first gay pride rally since a draconian anti-homosexuality law was overturned by the courts.

Sandra Ntebi, organiser of the rally held on Saturday in Entebbe, 35km from the capital Kampala, said police had granted permission for the invitation-only “Uganda Pride” event.

“This event is to bring us together. Everyone was in hiding before because of the anti-homosexuality law,” she said. “It is a happy day for all of us, getting together.”

The overturned law, condemned as “abominable” by rights groups but popular among many Ugandans, called for proven homosexuals to be jailed for life.

The constitutional court rejected the law on a technicality on 1 August, six months after it took effect. The government swiftly filed an appeal, while MPs have signed a petition for a new vote on the bill.

Homosexuality remains illegal in Uganda, punishable by a jail sentence. However, it is no longer illegal to promote homosexuality and Ugandans are no longer obliged to denounce gays to the authorities.

Amid music, dancing and laughter, activists gathered in a park on the shores of Lake Victoria, close to the country’s presidential palace. “Some Ugandans are gay. Get over it,” read one sticker a man had pasted onto his face. Continue reading

Ugandan Court Quashes The Country’s Anti-Gay Law

ugUganda’s constitutional court on Friday overturned tough new anti-gay laws that had been branded draconian and “abominable” by rights groups, saying they had been wrongly passed by parliament.

The law is “null and void,” presiding judge Steven Kavuma told the court, saying the process had contravened the constitution, as it has been passed in parliament in December without the necessary quorum of lawmakers.

Cheering gay rights activists celebrated the ruling, but supporters of the law said they would appeal at the Supreme Court.

“Justice prevailed, we won,” said lawyer Nicholas Opiyo, who led the challenge in the constitutional court. Continue reading