Much Ado about Dolce And Gabbana, And Freedom Of Speech

Domenico+Dolce+Domenico+Dolce+Stefano+Gabbana+t-coF0PNK0RxAgainst yesterday’s Dolce and Gabbana post, a commenter said: ‘There’s something called ‘consequence.’ If you’re ready to express your opinion, no matter how unpopular, then you should be ready for whatever fallout there is to what you’ve said… If D&G wants to talk, fine. Just don’t get all snippy when there’s a consequence. Freedom of expression is all well and good. So is freedom of reaction. You don’t excuse someone for saying something horrible, and then shit on someone else for reacting unfavorably to it.’

I’ve noticed a trend with people who express unpopular opinions on KD. They easily play the victim card, the ‘Hey, I simply expressed my opinion, you’re so unfair for disagreeing with me’ complex, especially if those disagreeing are multitudinous. While I draw a line on the bandying of insults (a failing I know I’m guilty of myself), I think it is awfully hypocritical to say something and bemoan your fate when a lot more people do not agree with you. Of course we all know that YOUR comment is YOUR opinion (for those who like to attach reminders in their comments). But does the fact that the comment is from the minority make it okay for you to expect the majority not to speak against it? What then happens to the majority’s freedom of expression? Continue reading