RANTINGS OF A RANDOM (Gay) NIGERIAN (Entry 22)

Blog_Rantings Of A Random (GAY) NigerianAfter the US Supreme Court made the landmark decision to legalize gay marriage across the 50 states of America, there were lots of reactions across the world. Nigeria in its true fashion went ballistic, mostly with people condemning the ruling and saying all manner of horrible things about the country. The hate that was spewed online could actually bake a cake. America was called godless, satanic and all, even by people who had applied for American visas several times and would move to America in a heartbeat.

I went on the attack, hacking down any hateful comment that made its way to my timeline on all my social media accounts. I did not care whatever impression these commenters had about me. I just attacked and hacked at every homophobic post that I saw till I got exhausted and realized it was really no use. Just as Khaleesi has often pointed out, homophobia is entwined in the DNA of Nigeria as a nation. So I gave up and resorted to blocking/deleting. If I saw any hateful comment or post, I either unfollowed its owner or blocked him. And by the middle of the day, I had deleted over 12 contacts on BBM alone and was looking forward to a no-negativity internet experience. Continue reading

That Piece About Nigeria And America’s Same-Sex Marriage Ruling

US-Visa1This write-up was done by Adaobi Tricia Nwaubani, and originally published on cnn.com.  It’s titled ‘Why are Nigerians terrified of same-sex marriage in America?’ And in my opinion, I think the title is misleading because the write-up certainly doesn’t explore any answers to that question.

But that’s just me. Read and let us know what you think.

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Late in 2014 when my friend, Zachary, invited me to his wedding taking place in The Berkshires this September, I was less concerned about having to travel all the way from Abuja to Massachusetts. Zachary is gay. “What if lightning comes and strikes the building?” I asked. He replied that there had so far been under 100, 000 gay marriages in the U.S. – and no bolts. “Of course, my partner and I could be the last straw,” he added.

That exchange may have been facetious, but many Nigerians are genuinely terrified of gay marriage. And they are distraught over the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent decision to legalize gay marriage in America. Continue reading

Bisi Alimi Expresses Hope For Nigeria After Drop In Support For Antigay Law

bisi_alimiGay rights activist Bisi Alimi has expressed optimism, after a poll found that support for Nigeria’s anti-gay law is slowly declining.

The poll, taken earlier last week, found that 87 percent of Nigerians support a law criminalizing same-sex relationships went down from 96 percent from a few years ago.

In an interview with GLAAD reporter Claire Pires, Alimi – the founder of the Bisi Alimi Foundation, and the first man to come out on Nigerian television – explains the traditional anti-gay attitude in Nigeria and his hopeful findings through social polling for the national LGBT tolerance rate. Continue reading

‘I Dream Of A Generation…’ – Kenny Badmus

63992_10153555709975809_6192961654373154903_nThe following is a Facebook post updated by Kenny Badmus. It was so riveting, I simply had to share. Hopefully, there are people amongst us who share in this same dream. Check on it below.

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It’s 4.48 AM here in New York. I just came back home from a long night of clubbing and partying. Or let’s say club hopping. My body is sore from dancing, but I promised myself to write this indescribable experience I had on the train home. Ok, let me try and describe it. I will try.

Four lads got on the train from Times Square. They sat just beside me on the long bench near the door. They were loud but they used no cuss words or profanities. When they referred to each other, they used the word ‘nigger’ or ‘niggy’. They looked like they were in their early 20s. Matching sneakers and shirts. Baseball caps with inscriptions of major leagues and pop artistes. Their pants were below their waistlines. Across the seat from us was a beautiful young lady with a butterfly tattoo on her exposed thigh. She wore just enough dress to cover all the right places but her cleavage.

“Niggy! I ma lick this garl up from head to toe,” one of the lads in the baseball hats said, as he eyed me to get some form of approval. Continue reading

Mozambique decriminalises gay and lesbian relationships

lambda-website-imageMozambique has decriminalized homosexuality in its new penal code, making it one of a few African countries where same-sex relationships are legal.

The revised code drops a colonial-era clause outlawing “vices against nature”. There were no prosecutions under that clause but rights activists have said this change is a symbolic victory.

It comes as other African countries have moved to tighten anti-gay laws. In Nigeria, a law that came into force last year banned same-sex public displays of affection and introduced a possible 14-year prison sentence for gay sex. A study released on Tuesday found that 87% of Nigerians supported a ban on same-sex relations.

In Uganda, the government has pledged to introduce a new restrictive law after the last law which criminalized homosexuality was successfully challenged in the constitutional court. Continue reading

For Instance, This…

for instanceThis is a Facebook post someone drew my attention to, and after reading, all I could do was laugh. It is a thing of beauty when one’s hypocrisy is shown up to him, stark and cold. And you have nowhere to run but into your shame.

Read and enjoy.

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This life!

So I am sitting in Terminal 1 at Frankfurt International Airport, waiting for my flight to Toronto… Been a super long wait… The Lufthansa flight from Lagos arrived three hours ago.

A Nigerian cleric came to sit by me. We somehow started up a conversation stemming from the CNN coverage of the Same Sex marriage Supreme Court ruling in America.

This cleric let out a spite-filled sigh, and began to tell me how the world has come to an end. He said Barack Obama is the Antichrist. He said all gays would burn in hell fire, and even here on earth, they would be stricken down by lightning. He said homosexuality should be punishable by death.

He went on and on. Continue reading

Hopes And Fears And Everything In Between

hopes and fearsChurch was fun all the way down to the sermon.

And just when the pastor was going to round up the preaching for the week, he brought up the one subject that makes me swallow hard in a gathering like that –

Homosexuality.

Of course, I swallowed.

Then he began his narration of what he’d been seeing in the papers – about how the same-sex bill could be revisited in Nigeria as homosexuality had become a global topic; about how the homosexuals are trying to take root in God’s church and lead people astray. A couple of prayers against us, present but unknown, were made. I was so stunned by the condemnatory nature of the prayers. And when the name of Jesus was called upon to stamp His approval on the supplication, I couldn’t say ‘Amen.’

How could I? Continue reading

May The Kite And Eagle Perch

epa03341640 Gay and lesbian activists attend Uganda's first gay pride parade and celebration at the Entebbe Botanical Gardens, Kampala, Uganda, 04 August 2012. Both male and female homosexual activity is illegal in Uganda. The parade took place the day after US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton praised activists who opposed a tough draft law in Uganda targeting gays and lesbians. She called them an inspiration for others struggling to secure equal rights around the world.  EPA/RACHEL ADAMS

Written by Kambili Chimalu, and originally published on Bellanaija.com

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A lot of gay Nigerians are increasingly stepping into the limelight to campaign for their rights as human beings deserving of respect and peace of mind in their own country. This is a noble and worthwhile pursuit, but it has led a lot of Nigerians to believe (and verbalize) that those who campaign for gay rights are trying to force some sort of “gay agenda” down their throats.

Nigeria, as it is today, is a very dangerous place for anyone suspected of being gay. People may like to deny this, but being gay in Nigeria is tantamount to dousing yourself in fuel and dancing around a bonfire. It is a death sentence, both in the literal and civic sense. The government has enshrined the persecution of gay people and their supporters in law that exposing yourself as a gay individual is simply “asking for it.” Nigerians cheered and openly displayed their bigotry when the law against same-sex marriage was passed. Would a gay person highlighting the injustice of that constitute as “shoving it down other people’s throats?” Continue reading

No Strings With Mike Daemon: The Teflondon Interview

TeflondonPosterFOREWORD: Ok, so I captioned it that way so y’all will know that this episode of No Strings has a KDian on the hot seat 🙂 (Hi, Tef) Check on it below and BE NICE.

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In this episode, NOSTRINGS talks with Teflondon (not real name), a Nigerian gay man who got dramatically outed by his then lover, following a series of trouble, even involving the police. Consequent to this was his apprehension and lock-up by the police, and upon his bail, the distrust of his family.

Ever since then, he has been doing his best to deal with his own personal issues and to find his balance again, and as well trying to understand life from a whole new different perspective.

NOSTRINGS had the privilege of talking to this young man, as he details his struggles and challenges and takes us deep into his life and how he now deals with his family’s constant pressure to change.

To have a listen, click to DOWNLOAD or STREAM LIVE