Movie About SCOTUS Case On Marriage Equality Already in the Works

scotus_gay_flagLess than two weeks ago, a monumental Supreme Court decision was reached that guaranteed marriage equality for same-sex couples. This piece of American history that will populate text books and be remembered as one of the largest steps forward for the LGBT community will, in the great American tradition, also be turned into a feature film.

The New York Times reported that 20th Century Fox bought the life rights to Jim Obergefell, the lead plaintiff in the law suit that resulted in the recognition of same-sex marriage in the country. Obergefell’s attorney, Al Gerhardstein, sold his life rights as well.

The studio also acquired screen rights to the unpublished book about the case that Obergefell plans to write, titled 21 Years to Midnight.

Though the film is at least two years from being finished, the story’s Oscar-worthiness is undeniable.

Photographer Slammed for Gay Iwo Jima Photo Re-Creation

flagPhotographer Ed Freeman created the gay flag image to the right more than 10 years ago for the cover of Frontiers magazine. Since then, it has been used across countless social media posts for its highly recognizable features — four men work to raise a rainbow flag, instantly evoking Joe Rosenthal’s iconic 1945 photo of five Marines and a Navy corpsman hoisting the American flag on the Pacific island’s Mount Suribachi in the middle of one of the most ferocious battles of World War II. Almost 7,000 troops were killed in the fight — including three of the Marines in the photo — and more than 19,000 were wounded. More than 18,000 Japanese troops also died on the island. The operation at Iwo Jima lasted for more than a month. The Pulitzer Prize-winning image has been repeatedly used over the years to honor American troops, and as inspiration for other work.

Most recently, Freeman’s image resurfaced after last week’s Supreme Court victory. Freeman himself posted the picture to his Facebook account with the following message: Continue reading

John Pavlovitz: Somewhere After The Rainbow

rainbow-flag-gay-rights-007Originally published on johnpavlovitz.com

The Supreme Court’s ruling on Marriage finally came down last week—and both Hell and Heaven broke loose, depending on your perspective.

Exhilaration soon followed for those seeing this as a long overdue victory for civil marital equality, while outrage reigned for religious folks believing it to be the final nail in the coffin of Biblical Matrimony.

And there was of course, a flurry of sentiments from both sides on social media; effusive celebration and grief-laden hand wringing flying in as fast as your browser could refresh.

Yet nothing in all of those eloquent words from either side spoke as clearly and loudly as the brilliant prismatic display of love and affirmation found in the rainbow profile photos now dominating timelines worldwide. That’s been the most visible, most revelatory element of the past week, with over 26 million people already choosing to “Amen” the Supreme Court’s decision using their own images. Continue reading

That Piece On What The True Story In America Is

Same-sex marriage supporters demonstrate in front of the Supreme Court on March 27, 2013 in Washington, DC. The rights of married same-sex couples will come under scrutiny at the US Supreme Court on Wednesday in the second of two landmark cases being considered by the top judicial panel. After the nine justices mulled arguments on a California law that outlawed gay marriage on Tuesday, they will take up a challenge to the legality of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA). The 1996 law prevents couples who have tied the knot in nine states -- where same-sex marriage is legal -- from enjoying the same federal rights as heterosexual couples. AFP PHOTO/Jewel Samad        (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)

John Pavlovitz, Christian, pastor and humanist, has come through again in a new write-up titled ‘The True Story Of Today In America.’ Read and be inspired.

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We all have stories we like to tell ourselves; narratives we create to frame the world around us.

Those stories often help cushion the blows and soften the impact when things around us are too frightening, too disorienting, too difficult for our minds to deal with.

These stories are often largely well-crafted fiction, born out of fear and desperation, and the sense of something slipping quickly through fingers: control.

Many scared Christians were telling stories today. Continue reading

That Piece About Trans Being the Flavor of the Moment

Laverne-Cox-and-Caitlyn-Jenner-MainOriginally published on out.com

Trans people are hot right now. They’re fabulous, they’re chic, and they’re the toast of the media. Isn’t that great? What could be more swellegant than that?

Well, kindly excuse me for a second while I choke on my metaphorical martini olive. I actually get a little bit nervous when large groups of oppressed people are suddenly swept up by the mainstream and declared OK. First of all, they were always OK. I’ve written about trans people since I started my journalism career in the 1970s, but now that they’ve been deemed trendy, we’re supposed to suddenly sit up and notice them? Furthermore, the mania to brand them as really cool accessories du jour is rather disturbing since a lot of the people jumping on the trans bandwagon would never have gone near anyone openly LGBT for years, not until they signified some kind of cachet in the commercial marketplace. Furthermore, they’re mostly picking up on flashy, famous trans people, not environmentally challenged trans teens, trans people in professions other than show biz, and those who don’t seek the spotlight at all. Continue reading

Ugandan Scientists Agree: Homosexuality Is Natural

PIC BY RACHEL ADAMS -  pictured: Gay Pride Uganda

A group of Ugandan scientists have endorsed a study showing being gay is natural.

The study, Diversity in Sexuality: Implications for Policy in Africa, was put together by the Academy of Science of South Africa, and endorsed by Ugandan National Academy of Sciences.

Uganda’s infamous anti-gay laws were justified with a study which Ugandan MPs claimed stated: “Homosexuality is not a disease but merely an abnormal behaviour which may be learned through experiences in life. In every society, there is a small number of people with homosexuality tendencies. Continue reading

Gay Twins Launch ‘pink LinkedIn’

id_17959myGwork is a global social recruitment and networking hub for LGBT professionals aiming to promote diversity and inclusion in the work place and beyond.

Set up by London-based brothers, Pierre and Adrien Gaubert, the site operates as a professional networking platform, allowing members to create their own profile, upload their CV, search for job opportunities, or simply share experiences and ask for advice from other members on the site.

According to Jonathan D-Lovitz, myGwork members can seek “direction, wisdom, assistance and inspiration” from fellow members. Members can also access a list of social events offering them additional offline networking opportunities. Continue reading

She Asked: FREEDOM OR A SLIPPERY SLOPE TO MORE?

Human-rights-abusesFOREWORD: My attention was brought to a recent Facebook post updated by a female, Eketi Ette. I read it, and I decided to share. Read and of course, let us know what you think.

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A few days ago, cyberspace was in a furore over a certain Bruce that has become a Caitlyn. Some little children somewhere now have two grandmothers, instead of a Grandpa and a Grandma. I’ve got one word for those children: confusion.

Messages of congratulations poured in from every quarter; many people hailed this man for his supposed act of bravery; for “refusing to hide any longer” and others for “finally being his true self.” A lot of people said, “If it makes him happy, then I’m glad.” I wonder why many didn’t extend the same courtesy to Michael Jackson and Dencia. Continue reading

Transgender Model Gisele Alicea Shares Her Journey to Finding Happiness

Originally published on glamour.com

FOREWORD: This has been a big week for the transgendered community. First, there was Caitlyn Jenner’s Vanity Fair cover, and then, Make Up For Ever unveiled its campaign with model Andreja Pejic, making her the first transgender model to land a major cosmetics contract. And now, another trans woman, Latina model Gisele Alicea, talks about her journey of claiming her true identity despite all the challenges that lay ahead. Much like actress Laverne Cox, who recently said that diverse representation is needed is the media, Alicea agreed. “I want to be treated like everyone else, with respect.” This is her story.

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gisele-alicea-square-w352Years before I heard the term transgender, I was a seven-year-old boy who loved dressing up in girls’ clothing. Named William Alicea and raised with three sisters by a single Dominican mom in the predominantly Hispanic Hamilton Heights section of New York City, I knew even then how the Latino community expected boys to behave. I’d overhear my family say men shouldn’t cook or clean, because that was women’s work—and other such machista comments. And they definitely didn’t think boys should dress like girls. But I did it anyway. My mother didn’t love me prancing around in my older sisters’ clothes, but I know that she was just trying to spare me from being hurt.

Throughout childhood I had crushes on boys and knew that I was gay, but I didn’t tell a single soul. No one ever talked about homosexuality—ever! I was 15 when I came out to my school guidance counselor, who referred me to a support group at the Hetrick-Martin Institute at the Harvey Milk High School. When I finally told my mom that I was gay, we cried together. She tried hiding her sadness, but I could see right through it. Continue reading

No Strings With Mike Daemon (Episode 12)

olumidePosterIn this episode, Olumide F. Makanjuola, the Executive Director of TIERS Nigeria, discusses with NOSTRINGS. He talks about and affirms his stand with the Nigerian LGBT Community, exposing new projects, touches on the infamous law, and as well goes personal with his experience as an LGBT Rights Activist.

Olumide answers tough, critical and vital questions on issues affecting the lives of LGBT Nigerians, and what could possibly be done to improve upon the way people handle sensitive issues like homosexuality, transsexuality, lesbianism and more…

To check on this, click to DOWNLOAD or STREAM LIVE