RANTINGS OF A RANDOM (Gay) NIGERIAN (Entry 14)

Blog_Rantings Of A Random (GAY) NigerianA friend and I were having a conversation the other day, and we naturally got to the issue of gay men getting married to women. He said something that I had previously never considered and which frankly made a lot of sense to me given the circumstances. He said that some gay men need the safety of marriage to be able to find their voice and speak up about LGBT issues. He said that the message will be better received in these parts if it’s coming from a married man (assumed to be straight) than from a single man who will be assumed to be gay (especially when he is over a certain age). He went further to explain that if a married man expresses public support for gay rights, Nigerians will most likely try to understand why he’s endorsing gay rights, rather than condemn  him. But if say a single man of forty years speaks up about the same issue, he’d be dismissed as defending his kind.

I was going to argue with him, but then I remembered when the anti gay bill was signed into law, and my friend Ayo Sogunro wrote a lengthy thesis-worthy article on why that law made no sense at all. Now after he wrote that, another friend of mine sent me a link to the article, not knowing I’d read it, and he began to make a case, agreeing with everything Ayo said. Now these points were points that I had previously argued in favour of with this guy before, and he did not buy into them because he believed I was not objective, being a gay man and all. However, following Ayo’s elucidation of the points, he was able to read with an open mind and made sense of it, because it was preached by a straight man who he interpreted as having nothing at stake and was therefore being objective. Continue reading

What They Say IV

Zachary QuintoI think there’s a tremendous sense of complacency in the LGBT community. AIDS has lost the edge of horror it possessed when it swept through the world in the ’80s. Today’s generation sees it more as something to live with and something to be much less fearful of. And that comes with a sense of, dare I say, laziness. We need to be really vigilant and open about the fact that these drugs are not to be taken to increase our ability to have recreational sex.”

— Zachary Quinto in an interview with Out magazine

Citing ‘exploding’ HIV epidemic, WHO says all gay men should take antitretroviral drugs

Daily Antiretroviral Pill Found To Protect Healthy From AIDS TransmissionAt the height of the AIDS epidemic in the 1980s, images of gaunt victims flooded publications and television, igniting a global awareness campaign that would eventually help winnow the annual number of new infections by one-third in the past decade. But those victories have also lulled the general population into a sense of complacency, the World Health Organization warned late last week.

“We are seeing exploding epidemics,” said Gottfried Hirnschall, who leads WHO’s HIV department, according to Agence France-Presse.

Those at the most at risk of being infected — transgender people, men who have sex with men, prisoners, sex workers and people who inject drugs — account for nearly half of new HIV infections worldwide. And because of social or legislative discrimination, they’re also often the least likely to access HIV prevention and treatment centers. Continue reading

Some Celebrities Who Are Out And Proud

Check out the many celebs who are gay and don’t give a fuck who knows about it.

Ellen Page1 EllenPageJuno star Ellen Page gave quite a moving speech when she took the stage at the Human Rights Campaign’s inaugural gathering in Las Vegas last February. “I’m here today because I am gay,” she told the audience. “And because maybe I can make a difference, to help others have an easier and more hopeful time. Regardless, for me, I feel a personal obligation and a social responsibility. I am tired of hiding and I am tired of lying by omission.”

Frank Ocean2 FrankAfter a reporter questioned Grammy-winning rapper Frank Ocean about some of his song lyrics in July 2012, Ocean posted his thoughts on the subject on his website. He detailed the love he had for another man when he was 19: “I won’t forget you. I won’t forget the summer,” he wrote. “I’ll remember who I was when I met you.” Critics and fans applauded the announcement, but the rap community — not so much. Fellow rapper T-Pain shared in an interview seven months later that certain artists refuse to work with Ocean because they’re homophobic. Continue reading

Bisi Alimi Debuts On The World Pride Power List 2014

This year’s World Pride Power List – which celebrates influential lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people – includes Russian and African activists, trans politicians, and CEOs of global companies. And Nigeria’s very own Bisi Alimi. This is the gay activist’s first appearance on the list, and he debuts at Number 77. Here’s an excerpt of the list (originally published on The Guardian), the few recognizable names I decided to put up in today’s post.

12. Jane Lynch, actor

Lynch, who plays Sue Sylvester in the TV show Glee, received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame last year.

24. Jodie Foster, actorJodie FosterFoster won best actress at the Golden Globes in 2012 for Carnage and, the next year, won the Cecil B DeMille award for outstanding contribution to entertainment. She has since directed episodes in the Netflix series, Orange is the New Black.

28. Anderson Cooper, broadcast journalist

Cooper is a journalist, author, anchor of CNN news show Anderson Cooper 360° and Vanderbilt. Last year, he received the Vito Russo award from GLAAD for his significant work promoting equality for the LGBT community. Continue reading

Gay Pride And Tel Aviv’s Rainbow Colours

tel_aviv_city_hall_lit_rainbow_flag_colours_for_gay_prideThe Israeli city of Tel Aviv has gone all out to celebrate gay Pride this year, with the authorities lighting up city hall in rainbow colours.

More than 480 LED light bulbs were used to create a rainbow flag lighting effect on the Tel Aviv-Yafo municipal building, making it, according to The Jerusalem Post, the biggest rainbow flag in the world.

The lights will be lit from 8pm until 11pm every night this week until Friday, when the city’s 16th annual Pride Parade takes place. The parade is expected to attract around 120,000 participants and will conclude with a huge beach party.

Considered the most gay friendly city in the Middle East, Tel Aviv’s Pride celebrations also feature an LGBT Culture Festival and an International LGBT Film Festival.

The Mayor of Tel Aviv, Ron Huldai, who will be launching the parade, said that the arrival of summer “is also the arrival of the Pride events that declare with voices, colours, music and culture a clear saying to our residents and our guests: The city of Tel Aviv-Yafo stands for equality, believes in equality and marches for equality.”

Tel Aviv’s LGBT community is the largest in Israel and consists of 15% of its residents. The city was recently named by CNN as one of its “10 gay honeymoon hotspots” in the world.