What They Say III

Mr-Universe-Nigeria-2014-August-2014-pulseThe blogosphere knew him as Francis Beaon at the time of his win of the Mr Universe Nigeria contest. And, according to his recent interview with nationonlineng.net, he is Francis Egwuatu, final year student of the Federal University of Technology, Owerri. I don’t know which one is which, and that is none of my business.

My business however are some of the things he said during this interview with Tolu George originally published on nationonlineng.net. It was the usual may-we-know-you oh-you’re-so-famous-now yada-yada.

And then they got around to what usually interests me in these celebrity interviews – the controversial aspects, in this case, the gay talk.

The interviewer questioned: Some people believe Mr. Universe Nigeria is a pageant for gays. What is your view on this assertion? Continue reading

Former members of the Gay Conversion Therapy Movement Apologize

ex-gay-top2Previously published on time.com

Former members of organizations that advocated therapy to “cure” homosexuality have joined LGBT groups in rejecting the concept.

Yvette Schneider spent a little over a decade as an active participant and a leader in the gay conversion therapy movement. In other words, she spent years working to convince men and women that they could stop being gay, lesbian, or bisexual through suppression and therapy.

But in 2010 she began to see things differently. At the time, Schneider did not share her feelings with her colleagues, but that same year, she was let go from her position as the director of the women’s ministry at Exodus International— a leading sexual orientation conversion organization that closed in 2013.

“I realized that no one was actually saying, ‘I’m straight,” she explains, referring to the post-treatment disposition of the Exodus clients she saw. “You can go through years of therapy and what are you left with—shame?” Continue reading

JAMES’ JOURNAL (Entry 9)

Blog_KD JournalJuly 26

I went to get myself tested for HIV. I told some people this and was surprised when they said “Why?” By people I mean my gay friends and acquaintances. First of all, why not? Secondly, things may be worse than I thought when it comes to being responsible. The fact that there has to be a reason to go get yourself checked apart from the reason of “it’s a duty I owe to myself” is a bit appalling. Honestly I don’t think you need to have unprotected sex before you check for HIV. Or doesn’t anyone remember that you can get it in other ways besides sex? At least, do it once a year if you’re the most careful of people, because you can never be too sure.

However there was a reason I went to check. I had unprotected sex about three months ago, and a condom tore around that time. Honestly, the idea of “no condom” seemed exciting at the time, but the months of worry and anxiety that followed was not beans. I’d fall sick and begin to wonder, or I’d read all the HIV propaganda and my heart would beat fast. I don’t think a few minutes of pleasure is worth a few months of worry. I’m going to buy packs of durex as soon as I have extra money to waste… I don’t want excuses for next time. I normally avoid asking people I’m chatting with or interested in whether they use condoms because I think the talk of condoms and STIs is unsexy, but to avoid things getting out of hand, I’ll also have to start doing that. Better to cut things short before we reach the bedroom and testosterone clouds my judgment. Continue reading