That Piece About Nigeria And America’s Same-Sex Marriage Ruling

US-Visa1This write-up was done by Adaobi Tricia Nwaubani, and originally published on cnn.com.  It’s titled ‘Why are Nigerians terrified of same-sex marriage in America?’ And in my opinion, I think the title is misleading because the write-up certainly doesn’t explore any answers to that question.

But that’s just me. Read and let us know what you think.

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Late in 2014 when my friend, Zachary, invited me to his wedding taking place in The Berkshires this September, I was less concerned about having to travel all the way from Abuja to Massachusetts. Zachary is gay. “What if lightning comes and strikes the building?” I asked. He replied that there had so far been under 100, 000 gay marriages in the U.S. – and no bolts. “Of course, my partner and I could be the last straw,” he added.

That exchange may have been facetious, but many Nigerians are genuinely terrified of gay marriage. And they are distraught over the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent decision to legalize gay marriage in America. Continue reading

Mozambique decriminalises gay and lesbian relationships

lambda-website-imageMozambique has decriminalized homosexuality in its new penal code, making it one of a few African countries where same-sex relationships are legal.

The revised code drops a colonial-era clause outlawing “vices against nature”. There were no prosecutions under that clause but rights activists have said this change is a symbolic victory.

It comes as other African countries have moved to tighten anti-gay laws. In Nigeria, a law that came into force last year banned same-sex public displays of affection and introduced a possible 14-year prison sentence for gay sex. A study released on Tuesday found that 87% of Nigerians supported a ban on same-sex relations.

In Uganda, the government has pledged to introduce a new restrictive law after the last law which criminalized homosexuality was successfully challenged in the constitutional court. Continue reading

RANTINGS OF A RANDOM (Gay) NIGERIAN (Entry 21)

Blog_Rantings Of A Random (GAY) NigerianHello guys, not that this is necessary, but all the same, I want to clarify that this journal is not a weekly account of my life. Therefore the things I write about every Wednesday are not things that happen between Wednesdays. Some of my entries are weeks apart because I am constrained by space to write everything as they happen.

I had a terrible week, and by the time Friday came around, I was totally exhausted. We had auditors from the regional office around, looking into the books, and everybody was understandably on the edge. My boss kept snapping at everyone as these men pored over every financial detail. And at a point, I secretly wished I could poison their coffee. So I was more than happy when Friday came and I called it a week and headed home to a cool bath, a good book and some coffee. Continue reading

For Instance, This…

for instanceThis is a Facebook post someone drew my attention to, and after reading, all I could do was laugh. It is a thing of beauty when one’s hypocrisy is shown up to him, stark and cold. And you have nowhere to run but into your shame.

Read and enjoy.

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This life!

So I am sitting in Terminal 1 at Frankfurt International Airport, waiting for my flight to Toronto… Been a super long wait… The Lufthansa flight from Lagos arrived three hours ago.

A Nigerian cleric came to sit by me. We somehow started up a conversation stemming from the CNN coverage of the Same Sex marriage Supreme Court ruling in America.

This cleric let out a spite-filled sigh, and began to tell me how the world has come to an end. He said Barack Obama is the Antichrist. He said all gays would burn in hell fire, and even here on earth, they would be stricken down by lightning. He said homosexuality should be punishable by death.

He went on and on. Continue reading

This Is How You School A Homophobe

Absalom is one of those people I’m just grateful to call friend. One of his qualities – his intelligence (and his crazy, lol). He recently had it out with a female friend of his on the ever-controversial issue of – what else? – homosexuality. And below is an extract from their chatversation.

It all began with her attempting to introduce Absalom to a guy for some professional assistance. It turns out that the guy is gay and she mentioned that. And so, Absalom pounced. Lol. Check on it.

gay schooling 1 Continue reading

RANTINGS OF A RANDOM (Gay) NIGERIAN (Entry 20)

Blog_Rantings Of A Random (GAY) NigerianToday I will be talking about one issue only which has been on my mind for a while and which has formed the crux of many arguments I have had with my friends.

I grew up with many boys – nine boys in total – because daddy had a few sons and took in every stray relative who needed a place to stay. Growing up was always noisy and androgen-filled. And then, as we hit puberty, I started going out with my plenty brothers and we began testing the waters of our raging heterosexual hormones. And all the while, I kept my budding awareness that I liked boys a secret, well and truly hidden by the strength of my mortification.

I eventually lost my virginity to our house help. Her name was Ogonna. I was about fifteen, she was twenty. I had seen a few porno movies in VCR (is that still around?) so I experimented with what I’d seen with her. The first attempt was a disaster, and I came in less than two minutes. *covers face*

Eventually we started having sex regularly after everyone went to sleep. And then, Mommy found out (Actually I was not the only one giving it to her; in a house of ten boys… Go figure), and she was sent home.

I went on to lose my second virginity (is that even a phrase?) to a guy when I was nineteen. The experience was electrical, like an explosion in my brain. And I haven’t looked back since. Continue reading

Ugandan Scientists Agree: Homosexuality Is Natural

PIC BY RACHEL ADAMS -  pictured: Gay Pride Uganda

A group of Ugandan scientists have endorsed a study showing being gay is natural.

The study, Diversity in Sexuality: Implications for Policy in Africa, was put together by the Academy of Science of South Africa, and endorsed by Ugandan National Academy of Sciences.

Uganda’s infamous anti-gay laws were justified with a study which Ugandan MPs claimed stated: “Homosexuality is not a disease but merely an abnormal behaviour which may be learned through experiences in life. In every society, there is a small number of people with homosexuality tendencies. Continue reading

May The Kite And Eagle Perch

epa03341640 Gay and lesbian activists attend Uganda's first gay pride parade and celebration at the Entebbe Botanical Gardens, Kampala, Uganda, 04 August 2012. Both male and female homosexual activity is illegal in Uganda. The parade took place the day after US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton praised activists who opposed a tough draft law in Uganda targeting gays and lesbians. She called them an inspiration for others struggling to secure equal rights around the world.  EPA/RACHEL ADAMS

Written by Kambili Chimalu, and originally published on Bellanaija.com

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A lot of gay Nigerians are increasingly stepping into the limelight to campaign for their rights as human beings deserving of respect and peace of mind in their own country. This is a noble and worthwhile pursuit, but it has led a lot of Nigerians to believe (and verbalize) that those who campaign for gay rights are trying to force some sort of “gay agenda” down their throats.

Nigeria, as it is today, is a very dangerous place for anyone suspected of being gay. People may like to deny this, but being gay in Nigeria is tantamount to dousing yourself in fuel and dancing around a bonfire. It is a death sentence, both in the literal and civic sense. The government has enshrined the persecution of gay people and their supporters in law that exposing yourself as a gay individual is simply “asking for it.” Nigerians cheered and openly displayed their bigotry when the law against same-sex marriage was passed. Would a gay person highlighting the injustice of that constitute as “shoving it down other people’s throats?” Continue reading

The Day I Find Out My Son Is Gay

father talking to sonFOREWORD: This poem was adapted by Teflondon from an originally written poem by Okina Idek, titled ‘If My Son Were To Be Gay’, and originally published on thelmathinks.com.

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The day I find out my son is gay

I will get on my knees and pray

Ask God to give him strength

For on this earth, Gay equals pain

I will call on him, I will say:

Son, I know it is who you are

But in society, we all play parts

No one will understand you being gay

They will fight you and break you

Hover and dim the brightness that is your light

They will discriminate against and incriminate you

They will judge and barricade you from happiness

They will not rest, son. No, they won’t.

But strive not to give up who you are Continue reading

She Asked: FREEDOM OR A SLIPPERY SLOPE TO MORE?

Human-rights-abusesFOREWORD: My attention was brought to a recent Facebook post updated by a female, Eketi Ette. I read it, and I decided to share. Read and of course, let us know what you think.

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A few days ago, cyberspace was in a furore over a certain Bruce that has become a Caitlyn. Some little children somewhere now have two grandmothers, instead of a Grandpa and a Grandma. I’ve got one word for those children: confusion.

Messages of congratulations poured in from every quarter; many people hailed this man for his supposed act of bravery; for “refusing to hide any longer” and others for “finally being his true self.” A lot of people said, “If it makes him happy, then I’m glad.” I wonder why many didn’t extend the same courtesy to Michael Jackson and Dencia. Continue reading