Much Ado about Dolce And Gabbana, And Freedom Of Speech

Domenico+Dolce+Domenico+Dolce+Stefano+Gabbana+t-coF0PNK0RxAgainst yesterday’s Dolce and Gabbana post, a commenter said: ‘There’s something called ‘consequence.’ If you’re ready to express your opinion, no matter how unpopular, then you should be ready for whatever fallout there is to what you’ve said… If D&G wants to talk, fine. Just don’t get all snippy when there’s a consequence. Freedom of expression is all well and good. So is freedom of reaction. You don’t excuse someone for saying something horrible, and then shit on someone else for reacting unfavorably to it.’

I’ve noticed a trend with people who express unpopular opinions on KD. They easily play the victim card, the ‘Hey, I simply expressed my opinion, you’re so unfair for disagreeing with me’ complex, especially if those disagreeing are multitudinous. While I draw a line on the bandying of insults (a failing I know I’m guilty of myself), I think it is awfully hypocritical to say something and bemoan your fate when a lot more people do not agree with you. Of course we all know that YOUR comment is YOUR opinion (for those who like to attach reminders in their comments). But does the fact that the comment is from the minority make it okay for you to expect the majority not to speak against it? What then happens to the majority’s freedom of expression? Continue reading

Piers Morgan blasts the Dolce and Gabbana boycott, says it’s another word for bullying

_54288832_piers_morgan_bbcPiers Morgan has savaged the boycott of Dolce and Gabbana after the pair’s dismissal of ‘non-traditional’ families – claiming that a boycott is “just another word for bullying”.

Legendary fashion designers Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana – who are gay themselves – made the controversial comments in an interview this week, when they said in part: “We oppose gay adoptions. The only family is the traditional one. No chemical offsprings and rented uterus: life has a natural flow, there are things that should not be changed.”

Sir Elton John – who has sons Zachary and Elijah with his husband David Furnish – told the pair: ” How dare you refer to my beautiful children as ‘synthetic’… your archaic thinking is out of step with the times, just like your fashions. I shall never wear Dolce and Gabbana ever again.”

Writing in the Mail, former journalist Piers Morgan said that while he supports gay rights and supports Sir Elton, he believes boycotts are “bullying”. Continue reading

“Who am I to judge gays for their sins, if they have sins?” – Archbishop of Canterbury

_65694542_65694541The Archbishop of Canterbury has claimed it is not up to him to judge gay people for their “sins”.

Archbishop Justin Welby made the comments while visiting St Alban’s Academy in Highgate.

Of his views on sexuality, he told the Birmingham Mail: “I’m listening very, very closely to try to discern what the spirit of God is trying to tell us.”

Echoing comments from the Pope – who expressed a similar sentiment in 2013 – he said: “I see my own selfishness and weakness and think, who am I judge them for their sins, if they have sins. We shouldn’t demonise and dismiss and hate each other as that is so dangerous.” Continue reading

A WORD FROM THE ADMIN

add_adminI know that Freedom Of Expression is a very valuable and catchpenny commodity in modern society, something the press and media hold dear and social media trolls revel in. And this post wouldn’t exist if that was all I had to talk about, because Kito Diaries has proven to be the home of everyone freely expressing their opinions, bandying them about and sometimes attempting to shove them down other people’s throats. All that I don’t mind. Oftentimes, these opinions have been marinated in cusswords and distasteful language. It’s a struggle, but I have made my peace with that too. It is something I’m after all guilty of.

But there is a line I want to draw.

Kito Diaries may be a hot bed of controversy, but it is what it is today because of the willingness of KDians to tell their stories and share them for the readership, delight, commiseration and admonishment of others. People who pen down write-ups, whether fiction, nonfiction or opinion pieces, know to expect either overwhelming support and pathos from the readers, or intense backlash for having something unpopular to say. And those who go ahead to write, in spite of the Big Bad Wolf known as KD commenters, are commendable. I know of some people who are still mining courage from within themselves to tell their stories, unsure what reaction to expect.

And indeed, all reaction is acceptable; freedom of expression is after all everyone’s precious toy to play with, right? Continue reading