That Piece About Trans Being the Flavor of the Moment

Laverne-Cox-and-Caitlyn-Jenner-MainOriginally published on out.com

Trans people are hot right now. They’re fabulous, they’re chic, and they’re the toast of the media. Isn’t that great? What could be more swellegant than that?

Well, kindly excuse me for a second while I choke on my metaphorical martini olive. I actually get a little bit nervous when large groups of oppressed people are suddenly swept up by the mainstream and declared OK. First of all, they were always OK. I’ve written about trans people since I started my journalism career in the 1970s, but now that they’ve been deemed trendy, we’re supposed to suddenly sit up and notice them? Furthermore, the mania to brand them as really cool accessories du jour is rather disturbing since a lot of the people jumping on the trans bandwagon would never have gone near anyone openly LGBT for years, not until they signified some kind of cachet in the commercial marketplace. Furthermore, they’re mostly picking up on flashy, famous trans people, not environmentally challenged trans teens, trans people in professions other than show biz, and those who don’t seek the spotlight at all. Continue reading

May The Kite And Eagle Perch

epa03341640 Gay and lesbian activists attend Uganda's first gay pride parade and celebration at the Entebbe Botanical Gardens, Kampala, Uganda, 04 August 2012. Both male and female homosexual activity is illegal in Uganda. The parade took place the day after US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton praised activists who opposed a tough draft law in Uganda targeting gays and lesbians. She called them an inspiration for others struggling to secure equal rights around the world.  EPA/RACHEL ADAMS

Written by Kambili Chimalu, and originally published on Bellanaija.com

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A lot of gay Nigerians are increasingly stepping into the limelight to campaign for their rights as human beings deserving of respect and peace of mind in their own country. This is a noble and worthwhile pursuit, but it has led a lot of Nigerians to believe (and verbalize) that those who campaign for gay rights are trying to force some sort of “gay agenda” down their throats.

Nigeria, as it is today, is a very dangerous place for anyone suspected of being gay. People may like to deny this, but being gay in Nigeria is tantamount to dousing yourself in fuel and dancing around a bonfire. It is a death sentence, both in the literal and civic sense. The government has enshrined the persecution of gay people and their supporters in law that exposing yourself as a gay individual is simply “asking for it.” Nigerians cheered and openly displayed their bigotry when the law against same-sex marriage was passed. Would a gay person highlighting the injustice of that constitute as “shoving it down other people’s throats?” Continue reading

What’s On Your Mind… III

Blog_What's On Your MindIt’s just one thing today.

A question, really – Who exactly is an African Man?

One major weapon which homophobes deploy in their gay bashing is “homosexuality is unAfrican”. If I could get a barrel of crude oil for all the times I’ve heard this weird logic, I would be competing with the kingdoms of Qatar and Bahrain on the Rich List. It’s even more tragic that a good number of gays have internalized this homophobic notion. We have probably all met gays who insist that “your gay side is only a phase to be explored in your youth and to be abandoned later in life when you (should) revert to your default straight mode.” *giggles*

A regular commenter on this blog once laid down a list of things which are expected of an Africa man. This same KDian (known for his impressive research prowess) is also always quick to whip out the many ways in which an ‘African Man’ differs from other races, mostly the Westerners. Continue reading

16 Opinions From Anti-Gay People Concerning Homosexuality

shutterstock_145027207Originally published in thoughtcatalog.com

The following are explanations sixteen people who are anti-gay gave concerning their stance on homosexuality. Read and let us know your thoughts, which opinions you agree to or not agree to.

1. Homophobic, but not anti-gay

‘People can be homophobic but not anti-gay.

‘I do not like seeing overly PDA for gay couples. Even for hetero couples it bothers me but maybe I have become more desensitized as I am more bothered by gay couples. I also am not a fan of what passes as “gay culture” these days. That being said, I have gone and voted for anything that is pro-gay rights. Just because I have a personal issue with it does not mean I cannot realize that from a political and legal perspective everyone should have the same rights.’

2. Overblown gay lifestyles

‘There’s a big difference in parading down the street in a pink tutu wearing a rainbow shirt as a man with a giant strap on and saying you want equal rights than showing people that gay relationships are normal. I think a lot of people who are outspoken about LGBT relationships fail to realize that in order to get respect they can’t tear down heterosexual relationships in the process, we all need to coexist. Attacking traditional marriage only serves to polarize and create homophobic sentiments. You cannot change people’s minds in general, they will change themselves if they grow and learn. Continue reading

We Are Still Very Far

2 KD farI wanted to share an entirely different story with you until a dramatic twist of events occurred recently.  It is just how awestruck I am at how far away we are in this fight for gay rights.

We were given diversity projects by our lecturer right here in the USA, where I am currently attending a youth seminar. The project was aimed at making everybody become aware of each other’s diverse cultures. When I was called out to speak, I started my PowerPoint slide showing the different cultures and traditions that exists in my traditional Igbo culture, including the ceremonial wine-carrying by the bride to her groom and how she has to kneel to present him the drink.

This is when the presentation took a huge jaw dropping twist. Continue reading