Author of Brokeback Mountain Wishes She’d Never Written The Story

brokeback460‘I wish I’d never written the story. It’s just been the cause of hassle and problems and irritation since the film came out. Before the film, it was all right… In Wyoming they won’t read it. A large section of the population is still outraged. But that’s not where the problem was. I’m used to that response from people here, who generally do not like the way I write. But the problem has come since the film. So many people have completely misunderstood the story. I think it’s important to leave spaces in a story for readers to fill in from their own experience, but unfortunately the audience that Brokeback reached most strongly has powerful fantasy lives. And one of the reasons we keep the gates locked here is that a lot of men have decided that the story should have had a happy ending. They can’t bear the way it ends — they just can’t stand it. So they rewrite the story, including all kinds of boyfriends and new lovers and so forth after Jack is killed. And it just drives me wild.

‘They can’t understand that the story isn’t about Jack and Ennis. It’s about homophobia; it’s about a social situation; it’s about a place and a particular mindset and morality. They just don’t get it. I can’t tell you how many of these things have been sent to me as though they’re expecting me to say, ‘Oh great, if only I’d had the sense to write it that way.’ And they all begin the same way — I’m not gay, but?.?.?.? The implication is that because they’re men they understand much better than I how these people would have behaved. And maybe they do. But that’s not the story I wrote. Those are not their characters. The characters belong to me by law.”

— Author Annie Proulx explaining to Paris Review the negative response from some readers to the ending of her short story, Brokeback Mountain, that was adapted into the Academy Award-winning 2005 film

Top Benchmark LGBT Films That Got People Talking

In the ongoing struggle for equality, LGBT rights have inspired some amazing fictional and documentary films over the years. Here are the top benchmark LGBT films that got people talking around the world.

Brokeback MountainbrokebaqckThe year 2005 was just right to make this movie. Massachusetts, in 2004, became the first state to legalize same-sex marriage, the U.S. military was looking pretty weak without full inclusion, and Hollywood was untested when it came to workaday depictions of masculinity. Heath Ledger and Jake Gyllenhaal played Ennis and Jack, Wyoming cowboys, who shocked each other — and audiences — by having sex in a pup tent in the mountains. Debates on decency roiled across the news shows, critics rang in with support, people stampeded to local cinemas to see an old-fashioned love story of kisses, betrayal, and Old West archetypes reconstructed with two men at the center, deeply in love. It’s also just a fantastic film full of sadness and longing set against the gorgeous backdrop of the Rockies. Continue reading