Bisi Alimi Expresses Hope For Nigeria After Drop In Support For Antigay Law

bisi_alimiGay rights activist Bisi Alimi has expressed optimism, after a poll found that support for Nigeria’s anti-gay law is slowly declining.

The poll, taken earlier last week, found that 87 percent of Nigerians support a law criminalizing same-sex relationships went down from 96 percent from a few years ago.

In an interview with GLAAD reporter Claire Pires, Alimi – the founder of the Bisi Alimi Foundation, and the first man to come out on Nigerian television – explains the traditional anti-gay attitude in Nigeria and his hopeful findings through social polling for the national LGBT tolerance rate. Continue reading

‘I Want To Own My Story.’ – Bisi Alimi

celebs 53In December last year, Bisi Alimi joined other global LGBT activists to speak at the New York City public library to mark 2014 Human Rights. His talk titled “My name is Bisi Alimi and I am not a victim” has been adjudged as one of the most moving talks of the day.

The talk was released a couple of days ago, and because I believe his talk will help support others, mostly Africa LGBT people who might be struggling with the challenges they are facing, I had to share.

Check out the video of Bisi’s talk below.

What Bisi Alimi Has To Say About The United States’ Special Envoy for LGBT Human Rights

Randy-Berry-named-first-ever-LGBT-rights-envoyIn a piece titled ‘Why I Oppose the United States’ Special Envoy for LGBT Human Rights’ which was originally published on the dailybeast.com, Nigerian gay activist Bisi Alimi states his stance on the recent appointment of Randy Berry as Special Envoy for gay rights.

Read below.

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The appointment of Randy Berry as Special Envoy for LGBT Human Rights drew praise from U.S. LGBT activists. Those of us outside the U.S. are less enthusiastic.

In February, the U.S. State Department announced that longtime diplomat Randy Berry would be appointed as the first Special Envoy for the Human Rights of LGBT Persons to help eliminate violence and discrimination against LGBT people worldwide. This appointment has been widely applauded in the United States, but many of us outside the U.S. are concerned that it may be more symbolic than substantive—and that, in fact, the symbol may be a negative one.

To be sure, the Obama administration has been the most pro-LGBT in American history. Most recently, in his 2015 State of the Union speech, Obama became the first president to say the word ‘transgender’ at a high-profile event. He signed an executive order last summer barring government contractors from discriminating against LGBT employees. LGBT health care disparities were addressed under his Affordable Care Act. Continue reading

Let’s Discuss…about Doing Things Differently

IMG_20150130_143724_4389FOREWORD: I would like to apologize for the two-day hiatus recently experienced here on KD by the admin. This was a consequence of an extenuating circumstance, one which has been resolved, and hopefully will not persist.

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I was recently chatting with a friend, and he let on to me that he believes he’s gay because he grew up with males. There was a custody battle over him when he was a kid in the States, and the judge ultimately let the decision of who he wanted to live with rest with him. Predictably, he chose his mother. Mother soon went on to marry a widower with three sons of his own. The youngest was a year older than my friend, and was his first sexual encounter some years later. These days, he’s still struggling with his sexual identity, and clings to the belief that his homosexuality is a choice he can put away when he’s good and ready. Whenever such a time is.

At the end of his narration, I asked him, “If you could go back to the time when the judge asked you who you’d like to live with, would you change your decision?” Continue reading

‘I’d rather live so I can keep fighting.’ – Bisi Alimi

bisi 1In an interview with Blanck Digital magazine, Nigerian gay activist, Bisi Alimi says he can’t come to Nigeria because he’s scared for his life. Bisi who came out as gay on National TV many years back has been living in the UK since 2007. Bisi says Homosexuality can be accepted in Africa as Africans are neither idiots nor senseless.

“Since I left Nigeria in 2007 I have never been back, it’s not a safe place for me. It would be sheer foolishness on my part to go back to Nigeria after the failed attempt on my life or the never ending run-ins I had with the police. It is one thing to be a martyr and another to live to fight another day, and I think I would rather want to live so I can keep fighting.

More excerpts of the interview after the cut. Continue reading

‘He should continue in the land of the dead.’ Proof That Nigeria’s Humanity is Ever On The Decline

So, while 9-year-old Americans were giving their teacher compassionate letters in acceptance of his sexuality, faceless Nigerians on the cyber warpath had no compassion to give, even in the face of a fellow countryman’s misfortune, just as long as he is gay.

Yesterday, gay activist Bisi Alimi revealed in a Twitter diatribe that he was recently in touch with a young Nigerian who intended to commit suicide to escape the humiliation of his recent attack. See his tweets below.bisi1 Continue reading