Pastor’s ‘Biblical’ Solution To Homosexuality Is Mass Killings

pastorOn the website of Pastor Steven Anderson’s church, the Faithful Word Baptist Church in Tempe, you’d find him boasting about the fact that he “holds no college degree but has well over 140 chapters of the bible memorized word-for-word, including approximately half of the New Testament.”

And where has this blind rote memorization with absolutely zero cognitive thinking skills led him? Why, to the cure for AIDS of course!

Not only does Pastor Anderson hold the key to curing AIDS in the evolutionary disabled organ he calls his brain, but he thinks he could do away with the disease by Christmas. Continue reading

What They Say IV

Zachary QuintoI think there’s a tremendous sense of complacency in the LGBT community. AIDS has lost the edge of horror it possessed when it swept through the world in the ’80s. Today’s generation sees it more as something to live with and something to be much less fearful of. And that comes with a sense of, dare I say, laziness. We need to be really vigilant and open about the fact that these drugs are not to be taken to increase our ability to have recreational sex.”

— Zachary Quinto in an interview with Out magazine

Russian politician expresses his outrage over Apple CEO Tim Cook’s coming out

timA Russian politician says Apple CEO Tim Cook ‘should be banned’ from entering the country after he came out as gay for the first time.

Anti LGBT campaigner, Vitaly Milonov reportedly suggested that head of the electronics giant could bring ‘the Ebola virus, Aids or gonorrhea’, drawing on his stereotypes of homosexuals.

According to FlashNord, the city legislator from St Petersburg said: ‘What could he [Cook] bring us? The Ebola virus, Aids, gonorrhea? They all have unseemly ties over there. Ban him for life.’

Mr. Cook made the announcement on Thursday, declaring his sexual orientation is one of the ‘greatest gifts God has given me’. Continue reading

The World Health Organization Is Perpetuating Gay Stereotypes

By Patrick McAleenan, originally published on The Telegraph

COLOUR - plse save tuesThe World Health Organisation has recommended that all gay men take antiretroviral drugs to stop the spread of HIV, but surely education – not more drugs – is the answer.

Anything else they’d like us to take responsibility for? Famine in Africa? Unemployment statistics? Binge drinking in Magaluf?

Being gay can often feel like the world is against you, and yet again the planet’s HIV epidemic is being firmly placed on our shoulders. I’m talking about the news that the World Health Organisation has announced for the first time that men who have sex with men should take antiretroviral drugs, in a bid to try and contain the growing rates of HIV in gay communities around the world. That’s all men who have sex with men. No mention of men who have sex with women. Are they all suddenly having safe sex? Continue reading

Citing ‘exploding’ HIV epidemic, WHO says all gay men should take antitretroviral drugs

Daily Antiretroviral Pill Found To Protect Healthy From AIDS TransmissionAt the height of the AIDS epidemic in the 1980s, images of gaunt victims flooded publications and television, igniting a global awareness campaign that would eventually help winnow the annual number of new infections by one-third in the past decade. But those victories have also lulled the general population into a sense of complacency, the World Health Organization warned late last week.

“We are seeing exploding epidemics,” said Gottfried Hirnschall, who leads WHO’s HIV department, according to Agence France-Presse.

Those at the most at risk of being infected — transgender people, men who have sex with men, prisoners, sex workers and people who inject drugs — account for nearly half of new HIV infections worldwide. And because of social or legislative discrimination, they’re also often the least likely to access HIV prevention and treatment centers. Continue reading

My 10 Years Of Living With HIV

Bisi Alimi talks about his journey with HIV in this very compelling story published earlier on HuffingtonPost.com. Read.

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Bisi Alimi 03The morning I was diagnosed with HIV was like most others. I had just left my hotel and was heading for the International convention center to attend the Fourth National AIDS conference in Nigeria. It was May 2004, 10 years ago this month.

The day before, I had just given a presentation on HIV and men who have sex with men (MSM is the term to describe men who have sex with other men but do not identify as gay). I was sharing the stories of the friends I had lost to HIV. The most memorable was my best friend, Ibrahim. Continue reading