That Piece About Nigeria And America’s Same-Sex Marriage Ruling

US-Visa1This write-up was done by Adaobi Tricia Nwaubani, and originally published on cnn.com.  It’s titled ‘Why are Nigerians terrified of same-sex marriage in America?’ And in my opinion, I think the title is misleading because the write-up certainly doesn’t explore any answers to that question.

But that’s just me. Read and let us know what you think.

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Late in 2014 when my friend, Zachary, invited me to his wedding taking place in The Berkshires this September, I was less concerned about having to travel all the way from Abuja to Massachusetts. Zachary is gay. “What if lightning comes and strikes the building?” I asked. He replied that there had so far been under 100, 000 gay marriages in the U.S. – and no bolts. “Of course, my partner and I could be the last straw,” he added.

That exchange may have been facetious, but many Nigerians are genuinely terrified of gay marriage. And they are distraught over the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent decision to legalize gay marriage in America. Continue reading

‘I Dream Of A Generation…’ – Kenny Badmus

63992_10153555709975809_6192961654373154903_nThe following is a Facebook post updated by Kenny Badmus. It was so riveting, I simply had to share. Hopefully, there are people amongst us who share in this same dream. Check on it below.

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It’s 4.48 AM here in New York. I just came back home from a long night of clubbing and partying. Or let’s say club hopping. My body is sore from dancing, but I promised myself to write this indescribable experience I had on the train home. Ok, let me try and describe it. I will try.

Four lads got on the train from Times Square. They sat just beside me on the long bench near the door. They were loud but they used no cuss words or profanities. When they referred to each other, they used the word ‘nigger’ or ‘niggy’. They looked like they were in their early 20s. Matching sneakers and shirts. Baseball caps with inscriptions of major leagues and pop artistes. Their pants were below their waistlines. Across the seat from us was a beautiful young lady with a butterfly tattoo on her exposed thigh. She wore just enough dress to cover all the right places but her cleavage.

“Niggy! I ma lick this garl up from head to toe,” one of the lads in the baseball hats said, as he eyed me to get some form of approval. Continue reading

Mozambique decriminalises gay and lesbian relationships

lambda-website-imageMozambique has decriminalized homosexuality in its new penal code, making it one of a few African countries where same-sex relationships are legal.

The revised code drops a colonial-era clause outlawing “vices against nature”. There were no prosecutions under that clause but rights activists have said this change is a symbolic victory.

It comes as other African countries have moved to tighten anti-gay laws. In Nigeria, a law that came into force last year banned same-sex public displays of affection and introduced a possible 14-year prison sentence for gay sex. A study released on Tuesday found that 87% of Nigerians supported a ban on same-sex relations.

In Uganda, the government has pledged to introduce a new restrictive law after the last law which criminalized homosexuality was successfully challenged in the constitutional court. Continue reading

Ugandan Scientists Agree: Homosexuality Is Natural

PIC BY RACHEL ADAMS -  pictured: Gay Pride Uganda

A group of Ugandan scientists have endorsed a study showing being gay is natural.

The study, Diversity in Sexuality: Implications for Policy in Africa, was put together by the Academy of Science of South Africa, and endorsed by Ugandan National Academy of Sciences.

Uganda’s infamous anti-gay laws were justified with a study which Ugandan MPs claimed stated: “Homosexuality is not a disease but merely an abnormal behaviour which may be learned through experiences in life. In every society, there is a small number of people with homosexuality tendencies. Continue reading

Kenny Badmus and South Africa’s Zanele Muholi Bring The Spotlight on Queer Africa

penqueerEstablished to combat the growing cloud of American isolationism after 9/11, the PEN World Voices Festival of International Literature aims to further the organization’s dedication to the freedom of expression through literature and art. This year, the festival has been organized under the chairmanship of Colm Tóibín, and it is the first time in its 11-year history that the content will be focused on a single region of the world. Co-curated by Festival Director László Jakab Orsós and Nigerian author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, the program will explore African literature and art — or at least, a fraction of what the vast and diverse continent has to offer.

This year also sees the inclusion of a workshop titled “Queer Futures,” the first time that queer writing will be explored on its own. The event reveals cutting-edge discussion of the continent’s LGBT movements, and participants include Zanele Muholi, a South African visual artist, with a new exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum; Binyavanga Wainaina, a Kenyan author and journalist; Shireen Hassim, a professor of political studies in Johannesburg, South Africa; and Kehinde Bademosi aka Kenny Badmus, Nigerian entrepreneur and writer. Continue reading

‘I’d rather live so I can keep fighting.’ – Bisi Alimi

bisi 1In an interview with Blanck Digital magazine, Nigerian gay activist, Bisi Alimi says he can’t come to Nigeria because he’s scared for his life. Bisi who came out as gay on National TV many years back has been living in the UK since 2007. Bisi says Homosexuality can be accepted in Africa as Africans are neither idiots nor senseless.

“Since I left Nigeria in 2007 I have never been back, it’s not a safe place for me. It would be sheer foolishness on my part to go back to Nigeria after the failed attempt on my life or the never ending run-ins I had with the police. It is one thing to be a martyr and another to live to fight another day, and I think I would rather want to live so I can keep fighting.

More excerpts of the interview after the cut. Continue reading

Kenny Badmus Concludes…

10305256_10152517784885809_6347334716945849308_nIt’s been five days since Kenny Badmus ‘broke the internet’ with his coming out post on Facebook. And in that time, there have been both love and hate reactions from different people with access to the internet. The brand expert has acknowledged them all and had something to say to all that on Facebook. Read below:

‘In conclusion, having reviewed all emails, comments, hates and goodwill in the last couple of days, I’m happy to say this is not about us. It’s about the ones who don’t have the platforms to speak. Or the one whose voices have been muffled by the fear of being rejected. The culture of shaming and silence has harmed us as a people, especially in Africa. Continue reading

EU court bans ‘gay tests’ for asylum seekers

g-stay8Europe’s highest court has ruled that gay asylum seekers will no longer have to undergo “tests” or intimate questioning in order to prove their sexuality.

The European Court of Justice, which oversees asylum policy for all EU member states, said officials will not be allowed to interrogate LGBT applicants about their sexual activity as it undermines the applicant’s dignity and right to privacy, and thus contravenes European law.

Authorities will also not be allowed to request video or photographic evidence as “proof” of homosexuality.

Over the last year, there has been a significant increase in the number of African refugees claiming asylum in the EU, as most African countries still regard homosexuality as a crime, the BBC reports. Continue reading

‘We Follow a Jesus I Do Not Recognize.’ Rev. Colin Coward in a Facebook Rant

colin-coward-the-independentThe Rev. Colin Coward, MBE, director of Changing Attitude England, recently wrote on Facebook about his displeasure with homophobia in Africa and the distortion of Christianity by those who are anti-homosexuality. Read below.

‘I feel incredibly angry today. I’ve been chatting for the last hour and a half with a gay Nigerian friend, a quiet, thoughtful, stable young man who allowed himself to trust a ‘friend’ who invited him to a café this morning. It was entrapment. They went to a place that was more rooming house than café which was a set-up, finding himself in a room where other guys were waiting to assault him. He has been attacked, threatened with a machete, kicked and punched, burnt with cigarettes, forcibly stripped naked, clothes torn, photos and a video taken, beaten, and those in the room were joined by guys he had seen playing football earlier.

‘He is a Christian and those assaulting him were Christians. He feels suicidal now, fears the police and further exposure, can’t seek medical treatment, is in deep pain physical and emotional.

‘Assaults like this against LGBTI people are a daily event in Nigeria and other homophobic African countries. I am seethingly angry at the distortion of Christian teaching that encourages and supports the abuse of LGBTI people. Continue reading

Let’s Discuss…About Homosexuality Being African

Blog_Let's DiscussFrom Dakar to Guinea to Burkina Faso to Nigeria to Kenya and to Uganda, there is a wealth of evidence pointing to the existence of homosexuality in sub-Saharan Africa before so-called Western influence.

1. In traditional, monarchical Zande culture [Central Africa], homosexuality is indigenous. […] Indeed it is very sensible for a man to sleep with boys when women are not available or are taboo.

2. Among the Kaguru of Tanzania, some women practise lesbian activities during female initiation, women taking both the roles of men and of women in demonstrating sexual congress to initiates.

3. Among the Mossi in what is now Burkina Faso, soronés (pages), chosen from among the most beautiful boys aged seven to fifteen, were dressed and had the other attributes (including the role) of women in relation to chiefs.

4. [And] according to Eva Meyerowitz’s fieldwork in the Gold Coast (now Ghana) during the 1940s, “lesbian affairs were virtually universal among unmarried Akan women, sometimes continuing after marriage. Whenever possible, the women purchased extra- large beds to accommodate group sex sessions involving perhaps half-a-dozen women.

The above are just four examples excerpted from Stephen O. Murray’s discourse of the evidence of homosexuality among various cultures in sub-Saharan Africa. Download Free PDF here.

So… Continue reading